PRESS REVIEWS

You Are There showcases the lush jazz singing of Shawnn Monteiro, supported by masterful performances of associates on trumpet, piano, trombone, drums, and bass. The charged, intensely passionate music crested with dulcet beauty of Monteiro's vocals makes You Are There a rapturous listening experience, highly recommended especially for connoisseurs of the genre. ” - James A. Cox Midwest Book Review

Joe Lang, Jersy Jazz 

 No matter how long one listens to the releases that come in the mail for review, it seems like one comes along by an accomplished artist who has been on the scene for quite some time and has somehow escaped the attention of the listener.  For me, vocalist SHAWNN MONTEIRO is such a talent.  Upon listening to her new album, You Are There (Whaling City Sound – 128), it was apparent that this is a lady who is a first-rate jazz vocalist.  The album was recorded at sessions spread over six and one-half years.  In September 2014, Monteiro was joined by pianist Kenny Barron, bassist Nat Reeves and drummer Joe Farnsworth for seven tunes, with trumpeters John Allmark and Josh Bruneau, and trombonist Steve Davis adding occasional contributions.  The remaining five tracks found her in the company of pianist Mike Renzi, bassist Dave Zinno and drummer Steve Langone, some recorded in July 2019 and others in March 2021.  The one constant is the engaging vocalizing of Monteiro.  Whether caressing a ballad like “Inside a Silent Tear” or “You Are There;” taking “Dearly Beloved” or a medley of “I Hear Music” and “How High then Moon” for a rhythmic ride; lending a bluesy tinge to “You’ll See” or gently swinging “The Shadow of Your Smile,” Monteiro is right on target.  All in all, Monteiro has produced a winner!  (www.whalingcitysound.com)

A real jazz vocalist whose dad worked with Ellington and is herself a link to classy ladies like Sarah Vaughn and Nancy Wilson, this set keeps showing you how it’s really done and frippery doesn’t make it better or newer.  A real penultimate set. ” - Chris Spector, Midwest Record

Scott Yanow, jazz journalist/historian

 

Shawnn Monteiro 

You Are There 

(Whaling City Sound) 

            Shawnn Monteiro is a veteran jazz singer whose conversational storytelling style and phrasing sometimes recall Carmen McRae a little although with her own musical personality. She was discovered early on by Mongo Santamaria, working in his band for two years before launching her solo career. Ms. Monteiro made her recording debut in 1993 and has since led six albums (including three for the Whaling City Sound label) with one of the highpoints being 2002’s One Special Night. In addition to teaming her with flugelhornist Clark Terry and drummer Jimmy Cobb, that album had her accompanied by her father, bassist Jimmy Woode, who is perhaps most notable for his important stint with Duke Ellington. Her new recording You Are There is dedicated to her father. 

            This set has the singer joined by two world-class rhythm sections. The first six songs feature the recently deceased pianist Michael Renzi (a master at accompanying singers), bassist Dave Zinno and drummer Steve Langone while the second half of the set has pianist Kenny Barron, bassist Nat Reeves and drummer Joe Farnsworth. Trombonist Steve Davis is a major asset on a few of the numbers while trumpeters John Allmark and Joshua Bruneau also have their moments to shine. 

            Shawnn Monteiro, who explores both familiar standards and a few superior obscurities, has a mature voice, a deep understanding of the lyrics that she interprets, and a solid sense of swing. She begins the program with a joyful version of “Dearly Beloved,” puts plenty of quiet feeling into Blossom Dearie’s “Inside A Silent Tear,” and is in top form on a contrasting pair of Dave Frishberg songs: the whimsical “Let’s Eat Home” and the emotional ballad “You Are There.” Renzi contributes some sparkling piano to a medium-tempo “How Deep Is The Ocean” and both the singer and trombonist Davis sound beautiful on “You’ll See.” 

            The music stays at a high level during the second half of the set. “The Shadow Of Your Smile” has some fine scat-singing and trombone work; their interplay is one of the set’s highlights. On “Autumn Leaves,” Shawnn Monteiro begins singing the verse as a duet with Barron, states the melody with the trio for a chorus. and then in the second chorus really displays her jazz phrasing, perfectly placing her notes without losing the words or the melody. A light bossa rhythm, a fine trumpet solo and the leader’s warm singing uplift the lesser-known “Alone At Last” and she follows with a personal version of “Never Let Me Go.” A cooking “How High The Moon” is sandwiched by “I Hear Music” before the set concludes with “My Old Friend,” a heartfelt tribute to a close associate. 

            You Are There is an enjoyable and easily recommended set full of first-class singing that features Shawnn Monteiro in top form. 

Scott Yanow, jazz journalist/historian

Keys and Chords online music magazine

 

 SHAWNN MONTEIRO RETURNS TO RECORDING WITH “YOU ARE THERE,” HER BEST WORK TO DATE 

29/9/2021 

SHE IS HERE! 
Release 10/15/21It’s been some time since we’ve heard from Shawnn Monteiro, jazz chanteuse extraordinaire. While the pandemic derailed most performance, Monteiro, who also spends a good deal of her time teaching jazz vocals in a university setting, managed to pull a recording together, and we’re all happy that she did.You Are There, her sixth release overall and third for Whaling City Sound, is the gorgeous sound of a veteran vocalist whose artistry is crafted in the mold of Sarah Vaughan, Carmen McCrae, and Nancy Wilson. For the ride, she enjoys the company and support of two distinguished trios. The first half of the recording are with her regularworking trio, which includes Michael Renzi on piano, Dave Zinno on bass and Steve Langone on drums. The second half is an earlier session at Brooklyn’s revered Systems Two studio, and features Kenny Barron on piano, Nat Reeves on bass, and Joe Farnsworth on drums. Trombonist Steve Davis and trumpeters John Allmark and Joshua Bruneau also make important contributions.Monteiro handles her material the way a painter decorates a canvas with color. Her uber-talent lies in her ability to crush a ballad, whether it’s a sexy beast like “Alone at Last,” or a bluesy vocal like “You’ll See.” Her voice finds the loveliness between the notes, the subtleties of a lyric, the sincerity and passion of a song or a couplet or a simple line that comes straight from the soul, with a warm embrace.Overall, the repertoire is split between standards-done in Shawnn’s uniquely tasteful and swinging way- and numbers that are less well known. In both instances, Shawnn makes her interpretations look easy, effortless. This, as most singers know, is quite difficult, but is what serves to separate Shawnn’s work from so many other jazz vocalists. She sets an example, a prototype, for how to deliver a song credibly, whether it’s old chestnuts or a lesser-known gem. Some who have heard this jewel of a recording have noted this is Shawnn’s best work to date. We heartily agree. But we urge you to listen for yourself. 
​ 
whalingcitysound.com

Bob Celmer, University of Hartford WWUH

 

Not sure if I mentioned it, but I've been doing a jazz radio program at WWUH-FM on campus since the late 1980's. I saw your new album You Are There and played it on this morning's Wednesday Morning Jazz. Great album! Really enjoyed it! Congratulations on your new album!   

Fresh and adventuresome...a dynamic presence” - Jazztimes Magazine
...one of music's most under-appreciated vocalists...” - The Hartford Courant